In this build, I decided to raid my growing pile of hoarded goods and find something quick and fun to build.

I found the ice skates in the trash in Maine, because where else would you find ice skates? The delrin was found at an old maker space I was a part of. The entire cost of this project was less than a dollar and that was just for some epoxy.


I began the project by using a Dewalt multitool with the wood cutting blade to cut away the plastic piece holding the ice skate blade on.This was very messy and little white plastic pieces are now all over my shop.1.JPG2.JPG

Then once disassembled, I took the blade to the grinding wheel to give it the shape I found desirable. I went through several iterations until I found a shape that did not resemble a banana. Don’t forget the most important step which is to keep the blade from getting to hot or it will lost it’s temper which will soften the metal and prevent it from holding an edge. To prevent this, drench it in water often. 3

Once I had the final shape I was happy with, I sized my delrin to a basic hand width and length, clamped it up-right and began drilling out the center to accomodate the knife blade. There are many ways to achieve this result such as cutting the delrin in two, carving out the center and then reattaching the sides with epoxy. However, I wanted to maintain the integrity and strength of the delrin, so I decided to drill out the center. 4.JPG

Once drilled, I had to make room for the exact profile of the tang so I heated up the tang over a little torch and make repeated plunges into the delrin. Once hot, the delrin melts like any plastic, allowing the tang to slide all the way into it’s final resting place. A little epoxy in the hole and the ice skate blade was well on it’s way to becoming an actual knife. 4.JPG

I let the epoxy cure for an hour then got to work shaping the handle. My personal preference is for a knife handle to be geometric. It has the most natural shape in my hands and provides more surface area for grip. Everyone has their own preference so take liberties with your own handle. 6.JPG7.JPG

Delrin is magical material that shapes like wood so using it on the Grizzly belt sander gave me terrific results. Once the final shape was perfected, I honed the blade and gave it a test in the kitchen. To my surprise, the blade actually held it’s temper throughout the project and cut beautifully in the kitchen. 910

I am very happy with the final result and can see using this material in the future. While not the most beautiful knife in the world, it is a proof of concept that allowed me to utilize new materials which were 100% upcycled from the trash to make a completely useful object that will last forever.

I hope you enjoyed the read through and learned a little bit about the process. As always, don’t forget to head over to my Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Patreon page to show your support so that I can continue to make awesome content like this.

Thanks for reading!IMG_20180304_205130-01.jpeg

On Being a Full Time Maker



Well, it has been about 3 months that I have been a full time maker after we moved to Chicago from Washington, D.C. I knew this process would be a lot of hard work and it is so true! Coming out to a new city with no clients and big dreams has been quite the experience. I didn’t know what to expect starting out so I put my head down and hustled. Three months later and I have been swamped. I started collecting clients via word of mouth and before I knew it, I was doing handyman jobs and building custom pieces within two weeks of touchdown. I have not had a lot of time to just relax and build fun things in the shop. 6

On our way to Chicago, I picked up an entire woodworking shop from Drew Fisher of Fisher’s Shop. We bought these tools from an older woodworker who was retiring the craft. The tools are from 1989-1990 era and all solid cast iron and steel Grizzly or other similarly good tools. Drew helped me rewire them before pickup and that helped free up a ton of time for me to hop into making. As it is with older things, they break a lot and require more maintenance. The prior owner did not take as meticulous care of the tools as I would have liked and so I have spent the past three months stripping apart every power tool in the shop down to their raw components and giving them a thorough cleaning and greasing. I actually have really liked doing these tasks because I now know how to tear down every tool in my shop. So far I have stripped down the drill press, bandsaw, table router, thickness planer, and table saw. I have spent hours pouring over old manuals and using the blow torch to loosen up old bolts and replacing parts. I have loved it!


Having different tools in the shop down at any certain point has forced me to get more creative with my fixes, forcing me to hone my circular saw and hand tool skills. All great lessons to keep me on my toes and constantly learning.


One thing I was not quite prepared for in Chicago is the cold. I know, don’t even say it. Chicago is cold and snowy, blah blah blah. I have been told a million times like it isn’t obvious. However, if you have seen my last shop video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH6s7BIHxZQ then you would understand that my shop is an old brick carriage house that refuses to hold heat and instead, likes to maintain a constant 20 degree temperature, regardless of the outside temp. BURRRR!!! Thankfully I have a little heater that is giving me the black lung… no, honestly, and this allows me to get it up to around a balmy 30 degrees. Not too bad actually when properly bundled up.

So yes, the past three months have been filled with a ton of client work with zero time and energy dedicated to making fun builds or YouTube videos. I cannot understand how other makers do both. My hat is off to them. All I can hope for is some free time when I can focus on fun builds and not just straight client work. I am optimistic that this is the start of something new and so I am keeping my head down and trudging ahead.

Wish me luck and send advice and comments my way! Thanks for reading!



What will await us when finally get there? Will it be fair weather or a different affair? Who will we meet once we gain the ground? Be it an ungainly beast or a cuddly hound. When we travel vast distances to find our delight, we hope that we are treated to an eyefull, despite. Treading along on this path of near folly, we sway and we dance, on toes quick made jolly. The winding path is ours, and will always be so. A straight line we’re not, squigley’s how we go! The den will be made with much laughter and joy. Supporting each other, renewing, not coy. To the forest we will go, to teach and to learn. To gather our strength and to renew our strong yearn. Our tale will be long, sun drenched and twisted. Love filled with kisses, full of intention. I love you, my dear, you fill me to the brim. When I lose my tack, my wind, it goes vapid. Your faith never ends and your glow always warms. My hands on your face, your head in my arms. May our journey be sang from the lips of the bards. Their telling of our ways, our trails, they will charm.



Retiring to the trees, we take our sleep. The gentle lull of timbers and the slow deep creak. We hang from the canopy on fabric made taught, to glide through the air, on our magical cot. As the forest turns around us, we find our delight. As trees sway and camber, all through the night. Our heads will be warm by hats that we wear. For when we wake from slumber, our hearts will be bare. For the trees they do calm us, on these nights of chill air. As our homes they will keep us, safe from the bears. My wife does sleep close, so that we may not part. And apart we won’t drift, intertwined as a pair. As dawn light breaks on our sleeping brows, we rise from our cribs as young baby sows. The heat it alights our bodies a glow, to bring new to the world, our love shall it grow. The day is a joyous triumph to be seen, a treasure to keep close an eye to be keen. And as the time passes and the trees they do sway. A tale will unfold, of our love each day. Our souls are renewed on this grassy glade, each year we give thanks and return just the same. We shall forever praise the glory of this hallowed place, always giving more than we must take. The wood for our heat, the meat for our bellies, the trees for our home, this place is aplenty. Our children will come and take from the glade. We will show them the bounty and to never be afraid. They will grow and love here and forever give back. For that is the cycle of our unspoken pact.